16 Things Locals Want You To Know Before Visiting Denmark

Denmark

I asked some locals what they wanted tourist to know before visiting their country!

Enjoy!

Zitta says:

1.  “Most Danes are not good at small talk and we are usually not comfortable with strangers who decide to come up and chat with us. This can be perceived as cold or unfriendly, but the truth is that we are just not accustomed to this level of public interaction. If you want to chat with danes, this is best accomplished out on the town with a beer in hand – we are much more talkative and approachable after a drink!”

2. ”Denmark is a small country of just below 6 million inhabitants, so we need to have an international perspective. Almost everyone speaks english well enough to carry a conversation and many are well versed in german as well.”

3. ”You will probably notice that we are especially fond of our flag. We use our flag for many occasions, and almost none of them have to do with being a national symbol, but rather a symbol of celebration.”

4. ”We will decorate with flags when someone has a birthday – this is probably the main use of the danish national flag in everyday life – which is why it is also commonly referred to as “birthday flags.”

5. ”Stores will use flags as decoration when the store is having a “birthday sale” at the anniversary of a shop’s opening day.”

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22 Things Locals Want You To Know Before Visiting England

England

I asked some locals what they wanted tourist to know before visiting their country!

Enjoy!

Milkaela says:

1. ”I don’t live in a touristy area. I guess I would like people to know that British and English aren’t the same; to queue politically.”

2. ”London isn’t the only city.”

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11 Things Locals Want You To Know Before Visiting Canada

Canada

I asked some locals what they wanted tourist to know before visiting their country!

Enjoy!

Alanna says:

1. ”Even though Canadians usually get teased about being too polite, we actually really respect people who are polite, too! (saying please and thank you, holding doors, etc.)”

2. ”Watch where you’re going. Obviously if you’re a tourist, you’re most likely looking up or through a camera, but it can be really annoying when people aren’t looking where they’re going and run into you.”

3. ”Traffic signs, food packing, etc, is written in both English and French.”

4. ”Also guns are NOT a thing. Only people who really have guns are hunters who have long riffles.”

You can find Alanna on her website and social medias: Adventures and Naps | Facebook 

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21 Things Locals Want you to Know Before Visiting Australia

I asked some locals what they wanted tourist to know before visiting their country!

Enjoy!

Daniela says:

1.“Australians are a bit like the British. They are definitely more aloof than southerners, and if you start a random conversation with a stranger they will find it odd. Once they realise you aren’t about to ask them for money or trying to pick them up they’ll likely be fine though.”

2.“Any suggestion that the Australian Government swooped in like tyrants and disarmed the unfortunate Australian population will usually not go down well. Apart from a grumpy minority, most Australians are very in favour of gun control and supported the Howard government in changing the gun laws following the Port Arthur Massacre. If a potential Prime Minister promised to reverse those changes they would be very unlikely to be elected.”

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How To Deal With Pushy Street Vendors Without Being A Jerk

How to deal with Pushy Street Vendors in Vietnam

 

Daniela also know as Mrs. Fancy Pants is here to tell us how she dealt with street vendors in Vietnam:

One of the biggest culture shocks a traveler from the first world can experience when visiting a developing nation is the shopping experience – not the products on offer, but how they are sold. We’re used to going to nice, orderly buildings, with stock reasonably easy to find, usually being pretty much left alone by the store staff apart from the odd “can I help you?”, and not receiving a hard sell. We pay the price on the label unless we live in a country where sales tax isn’t obvious until we reach the checkout. Maybe there will be some effort to upsell at that point depending on the goods being purchased, but it is usually pretty tame. Even street vendors in the more touristy areas of the US usually accept a polite “no thank you”. Our shopping experience, though, is in sharp contrast to the that of many other countries.

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